Causes of dating violence

Here are the individual risk factors for teen violence (2): Family factors for teen violence Some risk factors that your teen may be violent include those that are the result of the home and family environment.Here are the teen violence risk factors associated with the family and home situation (2): Risk factors for teen violence at school The school environment can also contribute to an increased risk of violent behavior in your teen.Here are some of the school risk factors that your teen may be violent (1): Risk factors for teen violence from the community Not only are there individual, family and school risk factors that your teen may be violent, but the community also offers risk factors.Dating violence is controlling, abusive, and aggressive behavior in a romantic relationship. It can include verbal, emotional, physical, or sexual abuse, or a combination.Violence in an adolescent relationship sets the stage for problems in future relationships, including intimate partner violence and sexual violence perpetration and/or victimization throughout life.For instance, youth who are victims of dating violence in high school are at higher risk for victimization during college.CDC also developed a technical package, Preventing Intimate Partner Violence Across the Lifespan: A Technical Package of Programs, Policies, and Practices that describes strategies and approaches that are based on the best available evidence for preventing intimate partner violence (IPV), including TDV.

In fact, statistics show that one-in-three teenagers have experienced teenage domestic violence in a dating relationship.If you teenager is part of one of these groups, he or she is at a higher risk for committing acts of violence against others, or being a victim of teenage violence (1): Additionally, female teens are more likely, at 12 percent, to be forced into having sexual intercourse, a form of sexual or date violence, than their male counterparts (at six percent) (2).Individual risk factors for teen violence Risk factors that your teen may be violent can be experienced on an individual basis.Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name-calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship—but these behaviors can become abusive and develop into serious forms of violence.However, many teens do not report unhealthy behaviors because they are afraid to tell family and friends.

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